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THE GREEN BOOK

Started in 1936 by Harlem postman Victor Green, The Negro Motorist Green Book was a guide published over three decades that helped African Americans travel the country safely, and with dignity, during a time of Jim Crow laws and segregation. The Green Book was also an indispensable resource for the era’s successful Black-owned businesses and rising African American middle class.

THE EXHIBIT

The Negro Motorist Green Book, an exhibition developed by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) in collaboration with award-winning author, photographer and cultural documentarian, Candacy Taylor, offers an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America and how the annual guide served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class and evidence of a vibrant business class.

Image credit: Boys Leave for Orthopedic Camp, July 3, 1958. Ross Pearsons. From The State Newspaper Photograph Archive, Richland Library, Columbia, S.C. [state_015_0061]. Courtesy of Richland Library, Columbia, S.C.

Suitcases next to a car

CONTACT

BOOKING

e: Minnie Russell

p: (202) 633-3160

REGISTRAR

e: Elizabeth Wilson

p: (202) 633-3152

CONTENT QUESTIONS

e: Marquette Folley

p: (202) 633-3111

PUBLIC RELATIONS

e: Arlene Irizarry

p: (202) 633-3582

The Negro Motorist Green Book was created by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in collaboration with Candacy Taylor and made possible through the generous support of Exxon Mobil Corporation.

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